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Wiltshire Community History

Folk Song Information

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Book TitleAuthorDateNotes
Song TitleAll jolly fellows that follow the plough
Roud No.346
Collected FromUnknown
LocationStourton
CountyWiltshire
Collected ByBalch, E E
Alternative Title
Tune
Date
Source Primary
Source SecondaryAntiquary 44 1908 p 381, 382
Recording
 
Song Lyrics
Verse 1

So early one morning,
Just by the brink of day,
The cocks they was a-crowing,
The farmer he did say:
'Rise up, my good fellows!
Your horses want something
Before they go to plough.'
And we jumped out of bed,
And slipped on our clo',
And into the stable
We merrily did flow;
And rubbing, and scrubbing,
I'll swear and I'll vow
As we're all jolly fellows
That follow the plough.

Verse 2

When six o'clock came
To breakfast we go.
With good bread and cheese,
And the best of stinged ale,
We're trying our pockets to fill,
And I'll swear and I'll vow
As we're all jolly fellows
That follow the plough.

Verse 3

Then we'll harness our horses,
To plough we do go;
We'll strip across the plain,
With out hands in our pockets,
Like gentlemen do go -
See who the best furrow can draw,
I'll swear and I'll vow
As we're all jolly fellows
That follow the plough.

Verse 4

And the farmer came round,
And 'twas he did say:
'What have you been doing
This long summer's day?
Why, you've not ploughed an acre!
I'll swear and I'll vow
That you're all lazy fellows
That follow the plough.

Verse 5

Then the little ploughboy
Turned round to reply:
'What have you been saying?
'Tis a big lie!
For we have ploughed an acre.
I'll swear and I'll vow
So we're all jolly fellows
That follow the plough.

Verse 6

And the farmer turned round,
With a smile and a joke:
'As 'tis just four o'clock,
Why, 'tis time to unyoke!
Unharness your horses,
And rub them down well;
I'll give you one jug
Of my best brown ale.'
I'll swear and I'll vow
That we're all jolly fellows
That follow the plough.
 
Print Song Lyrics
 
Notes
E E Balch - 'The unloading of the last waggon of hay is celebrated by a sing song round the rick in the long summer twilight; and the harvest supper still follows the harvest on those farms where its place has not been taken by extra harvest money. These are the occasions when quaint old country songs may be heard. The history of 'Bold Reynard' wanders through many verses, from the time when he disturbs the slumbers of 'old Mother Wibble-Wobble' till his children pick the bones of the grey goose 'without fork or a knife'. The fox in Froude's 'Cat's Pilgrimage' has not a greater contempt for human antagonism than has Sir Reynard, for when the farmer 'blew his horn both loud and shrill', he regards it only as an additional triumph to his progress with the grey goose -

'And the music played me down through the town O!

The 'Ploughboy' may be quoted as a typical song.'

Transcribed and edited by Chris Wildridge, 2008.

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