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Wiltshire Community History

Folk Song Information

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Book TitleAuthorDateNotes
Song TitleJolly shilling
Roud No.116
Collected FromKeen, George
LocationHigh Coggs
CountyOxfordshire
Collected ByWilliams, Alfred
Alternative Title
Tune
Date
Source PrimaryWSRO: 2598/36 Packet 4 - Wiltshire: Williams, A: MS collection No Wt 405
Source SecondaryWilts And Gloucestershire Standard, 25th December, 1915, p 2, Part 11, No. 10: Williams, A: Folk songs of the upper Thames, 1923 p 90
Recording
 
Song Lyrics
Verse 1

I have a jolly shilling, a lovely jolly shilling,
I love my jolly shilling as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And a jolly, jolly tenpence to carry home to my wife.

Chorus

There's neither pints nor quarts shall grieve me,
Nor this wide world shall deceive me,
But bring to me the girl that will keep me,
While I go rambling about.

Verse 2

I have a jolly ten pence, a lovely jolly ten pence,
I love my jolly ten pence as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And a jolly, jolly eight pence to take home to my wife.

Verse 3

I have a jolly eight pence, a lovely jolly eight pence,
I love my jolly eight pence as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And a jolly, jolly six pence to take home to my wife.

Verse 4

I have a jolly six pence, a lovely jolly six pence,
I love my jolly six pence as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And a jolly, jolly four pence to take home to my wife.

Verse 5

I have a jolly four pence, a lovely jolly four pence,
I love my jolly four pence as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And a jolly, jolly two pence to take home to my wife.

Verse 6

I have a jolly tuppence, a lovely jolly tuppence,
I love my jolly tuppence as I do love my life;
I've a penny for to spend, another for to lend,
And nothing at to carry home to my own dearest wife.
 
Print Song Lyrics
 
Notes
Note 1

Williams, Alfred: Ms / WGS / FSUT: 'The 'Jolly Shilling' was popular almost everywhere, it would seem: I have heard it in all parts of the upper Thames Valley. I obtained the copy of Elijah Iles, Inglesham.'

Note 2

In the WGS only the first two and the last verses are printed. Interpolated between verse 2 and verse 6 is:

The song continues, describing the reduction of the shilling until nothing is left. The concluding verse denotes the wife's final share.

Note 3

In Folk songs of the Upper Thames, p 90 there is an addendum:

Chorus [High Coggs, Witney version]. This is unattributed in both the Ms and FSUT but George Keen is the only recorded singer located to High Coggs, so I have attributed the song to him.

Chorus

The cocks are crowing,
The stream is flowing,
The landlady's looking for her right,
When we go rolling home.


Transcribed and edited by Chris Wildridge, 2010.

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