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Wiltshire Community History

Folk Song Information

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Book TitleAuthorDateNotes
Song TitleMy own dear home
Roud No.1306
Collected FromTanner, Charles
LocationBampton
CountyOxfordshire
Collected ByWilliams, Alfred
Alternative Title
Tune
Date
Source PrimaryWSRO: 2598/36 Packet 2 - Oxfordshire: Williams, A: MS collection No Ox 212
Source SecondaryWilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 8th January, 1916, p 2, Part 13, No. 9: Williams, A: Folk songs of the upper Thames, 1923 p 240, 241
Recording
 
Song Lyrics
Verse 1

When growing up to manhood if away I should steer,
Some hundreds of miles from my birthplace so dear,
I should say to myself - "What induced me to roam,
Or to wander away from my own dear home?"

Verse 2

Then if among strangers I should happen for to go,
In some briars and brambles all wounded with woe;
And if into great dangers I should happen for to go,
I should think with a smile on my own dear home.

Verse 3

Then a man from his labour he turns in the eve,
To them who did in the morning soon leave;
His wife and his children flock round him alone,
And they welcome him kindly to his own dear home.

Verse 4

Then he sits down so bright and merrily,
One clings to his arms and another to his knee;
He's free from all sorrows, with his children alone,
But he finds no place on earth like his own dear home.

Verse 5

Then a man sits down in comfort by his own fireside,
Whatever he desires there is nothing denied;
But he hears the wind whistle as he sits all alone,
He enjoys every comfort in his own dear home.

Verse 6

The man that is blest with a wife in affliction,
He would find a nurse that is tender and kind,
Who fondly would cherish him and weep while we mourn,
But he'd find no place on earth like his own dear home.

Verse 7

Now since his last hour in this world it did arrive,
He blessed all his children, his parents, and died;
His wife and his children in sorrow they did mourn,
For to see him conveyed to his last own home.
 
Print Song Lyrics
 
Notes
Note 1

Williams, Alfred: Ms: 'Both this and the following piece I obtained of Charles Tanner, the aged Morris dancer of Bampton. All the Tanners were Morris dancers, and it is said that the annual Whitsuntide Morris games have been observed in unbroken succession at Bampton for over three hundred years. Mr Charles Tanner was by occupation a drainer and he learned many songs, not one of which is common or modern. At the present time the old man is unfortunately bed ridden and a cripple owing to wounds in the ankle, supposed to have been occasioned by the too strenuous exertions of Morris dancing.'

Williams, Alfred: WGS: 'Both this and the following piece I obtained of Charles Tanner, the aged Morris dancer of Bampton. All the Tanners were Morris dancers, and it is said that the annual Whitsuntide Morris games have been observed in unbroken succession at Bampton for over three hundred years. Mr Charles Tanner was by occupation a drainer and he learned many songs, not one of which is common or modern. At the present time the old man is unfortunately a cripple and bed ridden owing to wounds in the ankle, supposed to have been occasioned by the too strenuous exertions of Morris dancing.'

Williams, Alfred: FSUT: 'Obtained of Charles Tanner, Bampton.'

Note 2

In the folder there a piece of typescript drawing attention to page 2 of the surviving notebook. There is a further verse [6 in this sequence] which while not attributed to Tanner may well be from this song. It includes the note, 'last but one'. Verse 6 does not appear in either WGS or FSUT.

Note 3

In Verse 4, Line 1 the WGS text reads:

Then he sits himself down so merrily,

Transcribed and edited by Chris Wildridge, 2010.

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