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Wiltshire Community History

Folk Song Information

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Book TitleAuthorDateNotes
Song TitleLord Bateman
Roud No.40
Collected FromHarvey, Henry [Wassail]
LocationCricklade
CountyWiltshire
Collected ByWilliams, Alfred
Alternative Title
Tune
Date
Source PrimaryWSRO: 2598/36 Packet 4 - Wiltshire: Williams, A: MS collection No Wt 362
Source SecondaryWilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 30th October, 1915, p 2, Part 5, No 1: Williams, A: Folk songs of the upper Thames, 1923 p 147 – 149
Recording
 
Song Lyrics
Verse 1

Lord Bateman was a noble lord,
A noble lord of high degree,
He set his foot on board of a ship,
And said strange countries he's go and see.

Verse 2

He sailed east and he sailed west,
Until he came to proud Turkey,
The Turks they took him and put him into prison,
Until his wife it was quite weary.

Verse 3

And in that prison there stood a tree,
That grew so very stout and strong,
Where he was chained by the middle,
Until his life it was almost gone.

Verse 4

This Turk he had one only daughter,
The fairest creature ever eye did see,
She stole the keys of her father's prison,
And swore Lord Bateman she would set free.

Verse 5

"Have you got houses? Have you got land?
Have you got estates at your command?
What would you give to the Turkish lady,
If out of prison you could get free?"

Verse 6

"Yes, I have got houses. Yes, I have got lands.
And half Northumberland belongs to me;
I'd give it all to the Turkish lady,
If out of prison I could get free."

Verse 7

Then she took him to her father's hall,
And gave to him the best of wine,
And every health she drank unto him -
"I wish Lord Bateman, that you were mine.

Verse 8

Seven longs years I've made a vow,
And seven more I'll keep it strong,
And if you'll not wed with another woman,
I'll never wed with another man."

Verse 9

She took him to her father's harbour,
And gave to him a ship of fame,
"Farewell, farewell, to you Lord Bateman,
I fear we shall never meet again."

Verse 10

Now seven long years were gone and past,
And fourteen days, well known to me,
She dressed herself in her gay clothing,
And said Lord Bateman she would go and see.

Verse 11

When she came to Lord Bateman's castle,
So boldly then the bell rang she -
"Who's there? Who's there?" cried the young, proud porter,
"Who's there? Who's there? Come tell to me?"

Verse 12

"Oh, is this Lord Bateman's castle?
And is his Lordship now within?"
"Oh yes! Oh yes!" cried the young, proud porter,
"He is just now taking his new bride in."

Verse 13

"Go tell him to send me a slice of bread,
And a bottle of the best of wine,
And not to forget the Turkish lady,
Who released him when he was close confined."

Verse 14

Away, away went the young, proud porter,
Away, away and away went he,
Until he came to Lord Bateman's chamber,
Where down on his bended knees fell he.

Verse 15

"What news, what news, my young, proud porter,
What news, what news hast thou brought to me?"
"Here is one of the fairest of all young ladies,
That ever my own two eyes did see.

Verse 16

She has got rings on every finger,
And round one of them she has got three,
And as much gay clothing hangs around her middle
As would buy all Nothumberly.

Verse 17

She bids you send her a slice of bread,
And a bottle of the best of wine,
And not to forget the fair young lady
Who released you when you were close confined."

Verse 18

Lord Bateman then flew in a passion,
And broke his sword into splinters three,
Saying, "I will give all of my father's riches,
If Sophia has crossed the sea."

Verse 19

Then up spoke this young bride's mother -
She was never heard to speak so free -
"Oh, do not forget my only daughter,
If Sophia has come across the sea."

Verse 20

"I'll own I made a bride of your daughter,
She's none the better nor the worse for me,
She came to me with her horse and saddle,
And she may go back in her coach and three."

Verse 21

Then he prepared another wedding,
With both their hearts so full of glee -
"I'll roam no more in a foreign country,
Now since Sophia has crossed the sea."
 
Print Song Lyrics
 
Notes
Williams, Alfred: Ms / WGS: 'A well known old ballad, the popular version of a still earlier piece. It is said to have been published and sung by the Turks at Constantinople. Common to the whole of the Thames Valley, though never sung now. I obtained my version of 'Wassail' Harvey, of Cricklade, and Shadrach Haydon, of Hatford, Faringdon.'

Williams, Alfred: FSUT: 'A well known old ballad, the popular version of a still earlier piece. It is said been thought to refer to the period of the Crusades. Common to the whole of the Thames Valley, though never sung now. I obtained my version of 'Wassail' Harvey, of Cricklade, and Shadrach Haydon, of Hatford, Faringdon.'

Transcribed and edited by Chris Wildridge, 2010.

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